Wednesday, January 23, 2008

Mesothelioma: New treatments for Mesothelioma cancer

There are more treatment possibilities for Mesothelioma cancer than surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy: the clinical trials. They offer no only benefits, but also risks that cancer patients should know before taking part in one of these research studies.

The U.S. National Cancer Institute sponsors clinical trials, because Mesothelioma cancer is difficult to control. This research is being performed to find out new treatments and better ways to use the current medical procedures.

Clinical trials are performed before the application of any new treatment in human beings, because doctors should know if the treatment is safe for their patients and effective to fight the disease on the stage level in which is.

Patients with mesothelioma can participate in research programs as a treatment option, because the possibility exists in the United States. People interested in take part in a clinical trial, however, should talk with their doctors before.

There is information about clinical trials in the Cancer Information Service (CIS) of the above mentioned Institute or may call to the toll-free phone number 1–800–4–CANCER to talk to CIS staff who may identify and provide detailed information about specific ongoing clinical trials.

The Web have various information about the subject, such as basic trial information, trial description with a summary and the eligibility criteria, and trial sites and contacts in the U.S.

About The Author
Hector Milla
Article written by the staff of a website edited by Hector Milla, if you want to read more articles about mesothelioma cancer, feel free to visit, or you can reprint this article in your website or ezine, always mentioning the author above and keeping a live link.

Mesothelioma: Treatments for Mesothelioma Cancer

Mesothelioma cancer is currently treated through three treatments, depending on the cancer location, the disease stage, and the patient's general health and age. These treatments are surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy, which sometimes are combined to fight the disease in so far as possible.

In a surgery, one of the most common treatments for mesothelioma, the doctor removes part of the lining of the abdomen or the chest and some tissue around it. In a pneumonectomy, the doctor may also remove one lung when the patient has pleural mesothelioma or cancer of the pleura. In other surgical procedure, the doctor may also remove part of the diaphragm, the muscle below the lungs that helps with breathing.

Through these procedures, the medical specialist shall try to excise tumourous tissue arising from this cancer disease. As these operations will reduce the patient's respiratory capacity, the surgeon will evaluate the patient's ability to function after a lung tissue removal, before performing a pneumonectomy.

Another method to fight Mesothelioma is chemotherapy or the use of anticancer drugs to kill cancer cells throughout the body. These drugs are given to the patient by an intravenous procedure, an injection into a vein. Currently, experts are studying the effectiveness of intracavitary chemotherapy or the possibility of giving chemotherapy straight to the chest or abdomen.

Radiotherapy or radiation therapy is the use of high-energy rays to destroy malignant cells and shrink tumors. It is important to know that this medical procedure attacks the cancer cells only in the treated area. There are two ways of giving this therapy. One, external radiation, in which the radiation comes from a machine, and other, internal radiation, where the cancer cells are found after putting materials that produce radiation into the affected area.

Doctor's way to relieve patient's pain is to use a needle or a thin tube to drain fluid that has built up in the abdominal or chest cavities through a procedure called thoracentesis, when it is from the chest, and paracentesis, when the removal is from the abdomen. The specialists may also give the drugs through a tube in the chest to prevent the accumulation of more liquid.

About The Author
Hector Milla
Article written by the staff of a website edited by Hector Milla, if you want to read more articles about mesothelioma cancer information, feel free to visit, or by swib asbestos information, you can reprint this article in your website or ezine, always mentioning the author above and keeping a live link.

What Is Mesothelioma?

Mesothelioma (cancer of the mesothelium) is a disease in which cells of the mesothelium become abnormal and divide without control or order. They can invade and damage nearby tissues and organs. Cancer cells can also metastasize (spread) from their original site to other parts of the body. Most cases of mesothelioma begin in the pleura or peritoneum.

Mesothelioma is a benign (noncancerous) or malignant (cancerous) tumor affecting the lining of the chest or abdomen. Exposure to asbestos particles in the air increases the risk of developing malignant mesothelioma. The Mesothelioma is a rare form of cancer that involves the mesothelium, or cells that line an organ, abdominal organs, usually the lungs, and heart. The most common form of mesothelioma is pleural mesothelioma, where the malignant tumors form on the pleura, the sac that lines the chest cavity and protects the lungs. Other forms of mesothelioma affect the peritoneum (abdominal cavity lining) and the pericardium (which is lining around the heart).

Mesothelioma is usually caused by asbestos exposure. Asbestos mesothelioma is a fibrous mineral known to be carcinogenic. People who are exposed to asbestos fibers for just a short period of time (few weeks) or even to a small amount may be at risk. In particular, people working with asbestos and their family members or those who live with them develop mesothelioma. There is a long latency period between initial exposure to asbestos and the development of malignant tumors. On average, 35-40 years elapse before the onset of disease.

The early symptoms of mesothelioma can resemble pneumonia, including shortness of breath, difficulty breathing, persistent cough, chest and abdominal pain. Often, there is fluid buildup between the pleura and chest cavity (called pleural effusions), which leads to dyspnea (shortness of breath) and sometimes pain. Some people may not have any symptoms.

Treatment for mesothelioma cancer can be surgery to remove the tumors, chemotherapy, radiation, or a combination of the three. Depending on the person’s health, time of diagnosis, and other factors, the survival rate is about four to 12 months from the onset of symptoms. However, occasionally people may live longer.

About The Author
Steve Austin
For more free legal information on Mesothelioma and Asbestos Lawsuits, please visit

What Is Mesothelioma?

Mesothelioma the medical name for cancer of the pleura (the lining of the lung and chest cavity) or cancer of the peritoneum (the lining of the abdomen). It is usually caused by prolonged or persistent exposure to asbestos.

Symptoms of mesothelioma may not appear until between twenty and fifty years after exposure, which explains why so many new cases of this form of cancer are coming to light now, even though the dangers of asbestos were realized long ago and measures taken to reduce the risk of the disease.

As with many forms of cancer, the mesothelioma tumor can spread rapidly, often infecting the opposite pleura, and continuing on to other internal organs. Symptoms include a shortness of breath, chest pains, coughing, and loss of weight.

Testing can be carried out initially by X-Ray, with a Thoric CT and open lung biopsy being used to confirm the findings of the early tests. If it is diagnosed early enough, the tumor can be surgically removed, and with follow-up chemotherapy and radiation treatment, full recovery is often possible.

However, in more advanced cases, cure is usually not possible. In such cases, chemotherapy and radiation treatment can be used alongside other pain relief treatments, to ease the symptoms.

Where cure is not possible, the average survival time is between four and eighteen months, depending on the stage of the tumor and the general health of the patient.

About The Author
Angela Cambourne owns and maintains the Mesothelioma Hub, an extensive resource site.